5 unsettling turns OUAT has taken in season 6

http://theinscribermag.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/1448394516.jpg

Those of you who read my blog know that I’m devoted to ABC’s Once Upon A Time. In fact, this blog began on Tumblr as “My Own Little Storybrooke”. Because I’m generally busy most evenings, I’ve been saving this season’s OUAT episodes to binge watch over the holidays, which I’ve been doing, and a few things strike me as I do.

  1. I’ve forgotten how amazing the show is and how much I enjoy it.
  2. I’m shocked at how dark the show has become.
  3. I’m surprised at how what once would have made me squeal with delight now makes me cringe in discomfort.

Let me explain point number three.

From season one, the storyline establishing Rumplestiltskin as the Beast in Beauty and the Beast was incredible and I loved watching Robert Carlyle portray Rumpy’s developing character. I was thrilled to see Rumpy flirt with Cora in the story of The Miller’s Daughter, and even hoped to see him paired with Regina when he was mentoring her.

But this season?

This season seems to be bringing a whole host of unenchanted storylines that are too close to real-life disturbing situations. Here are my reasons for saying this season is quite unsettling:

1. Emma may be suffering from a serious neurological disorder.

Emma has begun to have visions of her fatal future. These visions are accompanied with hand tremors that may be evidence of something as benign as hypoglycemia, anxiety, or fatigue, but which could be indicative of something more serious, such as a brain tumor, hyperthyroidism, or Parkinson’s disease. Rather than consider she may be seriously ill and in need of medical attention, Emma is treated by psychiatrist Jiminy/Archie. Her condition is especially foreboding when you consider that her visions are about her death, and something like a brain tumor can be quite deadly.

2. The children of Zelena and the Evil Queen.

Having struggled with their inherent evilness, Zelena and the Evil Queen have resolved to show their children just how wicked they can be. Rather than hide their affinity with the dark side of their personalities, the sisters hope their children will follow in their footsteps. None of this hits closer to home than the scene where the Evil Queen is coercing Henry to smash the heart of the Dragon to release Regina and Emma from their mirrored prison. Let’s unpack this: the Evil Queen is trying to convince her son to kill an innocent man to save his moms. This is particularly unsettling when you remember that the Evil Queen is the one who had created the mirror prison in the first place. Rather than wave her hand to release them, she attempts to bully Henry into committing murder, dragging him down into her dark pit alongside her.

3. Rumplestiltskin and the Evil Queen getting it on.

Though not technically adultery, Rumpy continues to profess his love for Belle while engaging the Evil Queen in some hanky-panky. Though I find the scenes incredibly sexy, there’s something not right about it. First of all, Rumpy had an intimate relationship with Cora, Regina and Zelena’s mother. Zelena had admitted she tried to get Rumpy into bed. The Evil Queen said they’ve always had a chemistry and now their relationship has been taken to another level. This means that Rumpy has, at the very least, bedded mother and daughter, and come close to bedding mother and daughters, which is kind of gross. Furthermore, Rumpy/Gold is grandfather to the Evil Queen’s adopted son, which adds another rather freaky layer to a really messed-up storyline.

4. Belle is an abused wife.

Having heard that Gold wants to sever his child from his destiny the moment he’s born, Belle goes into warrior-mom mode and tries to escape Storybrooke. When Gold gets wind of her plan, he slaps a gold bangle onto her wrist, binding her to the town. This comes hot on the heels of him keeping her captive on the Jolly Roger to protect her from Jekyll and Hyde. Belle is essentially emotionally abused by her ex-husband, held against her will, and in fear for her unborn child. Though she has said she doubts it will happen, she would gladly get back with him if he would only live his life as the good man he was meant to be. This is essentially battered wife syndrome. How many times has Belle returned to an abusive and emotionally unavailable Rumple, only to regret her actions? The poor woman is destined to live her life under Rumple’s thumb, as there is no way she will be able to combat the magic he can employ to keep his child with him. At that point, we can add Belle’s son’s name to point number two above.

5. A study in Stockholm Syndrome

In addition to battered wife syndrome, Belle is the poster child for Stockholm Syndrome, though she really can’t be blamed for it, as Beauty and the Beast is a textbook case. In the story, a girl goes to live with a literal beast to save her town. She is held captive, enslaved, and winds up falling in love with her captor. This story is meant to teach us not to judge a book by its cover, but the deeper story it tells is much more nefarious, especially where OUAT is concerned. Belle is kept in a dungeon until she’s given house privileges. She must remain captive in the castle or Rumpy will allow the ogres to kill everyone she knows and loves. She is essentially his slave, cooking and cleaning for him, living in fear of his temper, walking on eggshells lest he hurt her or worse, someone she loves. Cue the abused wife argument above.

Honestly, I don’t know what is more disquieting: having to watch pregnant, optimist, bookworm Belle being abused by her ex, or watching my favourite character lose any and all of the redeeming qualities that made him my favourite character in the first place. And while Robert Carlyle plays the part with depraved aplomb, there’s something that’s not right about deriving pleasure from from something so vile.

What do you think about the malevolent turn OUAT’s taken this season? Let’s talk about it in the comments below.

Share This:

Posted in Commentary, Television | Leave a comment

4 New Time Travel Shows Worth Watching (and 1 not so much)

The first time travel story I ever saw was when I was about 8 and watching Classic Trek re-runs (of course, back then, it was called Star Trek and not “Classic”). I’d never seen anything like The City on the Edge of Forever before, and I was hooked. The Star Trek franchise has always done time travel well, which is high praise, given the other memorable movies and series incorporating the time-worn trope since.

The last book I released, I Was, Am, Will Be Alice, is a time travel fiction (largely inspired by The Time Traveler’s Wife), as is my as of yet unfinished manuscript, tentatively entitled Cat and Mouse: A Love Story, largely inspired

This recent television season has seen an explosion of time travel television shows and it doesn’t disappoint, for the most part. In a medium in which good science fiction (and sometimes, any science fiction) is hard to find, you might ask why this particular genre has exploded at this moment in time. A recent CBC broadcast proposed that the phenomenon is due to the current political climate and how people seemed to view the past as a simpler time. With what is happening in the world today, the influx of time travel television reflects people’s desire to turn the clock back to that simpler time. Glamour suggests this may be because we, as a society, have acknowledged the error of our ways and long for a way to fix our future by  going back and fixing our past.

To honour the current television season, here’s a list of 4 new time travel shows (in no particular order) worth watching (and 1 not so much).

1. Travelers

The future is a dystopia, largely due to the fact that a meteor will hit Earth with devastating consequences. They have figured out how to transfer consciousness back in time with the help of a large supercomputer. A team of scientists have their consciousnesses  sent back in time to change the past and make the world a better place. To do this, the supercomputer–known as the Director–pinpoints the moment of a host’s death and transfers the future consciousness in the seconds before the host dies. This show is made interesting by the characters of the hosts, which include an FBI agent with a failing marriage, a mentally impaired woman and her social worker, an addict, a teenaged football player, and a woman who is fighting for custody of her son with her abusive, police officer husband.  Eric McCormack, a long time favourite of mine since Will and Grace, stars.

2. Timeless

When a seemingly bad guy steals a time machine from a top secret think tank, a historian, a soldier, and a pilot chase him through time in an effort to preserve the timeline. In the first episode, misunderstood Garcia Flynn (expertly played Goran Visnjic) introduces the Rittenhouse Corporation, a Mafia-like group of people who have infiltrated every aspect of government and power corporations for centuries. Through the course of the season, we learn that Flynn is only out to stop Rittenhouse to save his family (whom he believes was murdered by members of Rittenhouse) and make the world a better place. Abigail Spencer, Matt Lanter, and Malcolm Barrett have such incredible chemistry as the team of heroes out to stop Flynn, that by the time they realize they’re fighting for the wrong team, they can do no wrong in the viewers’ eyes.

3. Frequency

Based on the movie by the same name, Frequency supposes that a ham radio can connect the present to the past. In Frequency, police officer Raimy Sullivan learns she can talk to her father over his old radio. The only problem is her father died 20 years ago. Raimy gives her father advice which saves him from the accident that took his life. She goes into work the next morning only to learn that her mother–safe before Raimy had saved her father’s life–went missing twenty years ago and her bones are on the coroner’s table. Her mother, it seems, was a victim of the Nightingale Killer. As if to make matters worse, she is a stranger to her fiancee. Raimy and her father, Frank, spend the season as partners as they try to catch the Nightingale Killer on both ends of the time continuum.

 

4. Time After Time

I remember seeing Time After Time, the movie, as a young adult. I loved the fact that H. G. Wells was portrayed as a time traveller. The Time Machine reads more like a journal, after all, documenting the travels of a scientist into the past and incredibly distant future to check in on the evolution of mankind. It’s not hard to imagine that the novel was Wells’s actual journal. In Time After Time, H.G. Wells invents a time machine that is immediately appropriated by Jack the Ripper who goes forward in time to escape capture and continues his murderous ways. The show is more cat and mouse thriller than time travel epic as Dr. John Stephenson (Jack the Ripper) taunts Wells, daring him to follow through with his threat to capture him before his next kill.

*As an aside, is Flash’s H.R. Wells somehow an homage to H.G. Wells? Why else would the character–who hops Earths a la Sliders and who is known to have time travelled in the comic world–have been given a name so similar to the author?

5. Making History

A time travelling duffle bag is absurd on the face of it. Even so, I could accept it provided the show did something smart with it. In the first two episodes, Dan goes back to make sure the American Revolution happens, only to find that the founding fathers are even dumber than he is, and though they love their guns and will only be riled when the British threaten to take them away (cue the political satire), they refuse to do anything more than threaten to take the guns and aver their love for guns. There’s a love affair (as in Time After Time), false identities with modern names, and claiming of song lyrics that won’t be written for centuries (as in Back to the Future). Though there may be a few moments that made me smile, this was even more groan-worthy than Legends of Tomorrow at it’s campy best.

Whether the surge in time travel tales is due to a longing to return to a simpler time, or the desire to turn back the clock, given the number of celebrity deaths and the politics of the previous year, time travel television is a worthy, sentimental diversion.

Are you a fan of time travel fiction? Weigh in with what you think in the comments below.

Share This:

Posted in Alice, Commentary, Science Fiction, Television | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How to use Grammarly

https://pixabay.com/en/correcting-proof-paper-correction-1870721/

You’ve sweated out your story, lived, died, and bled with your characters, edited your work tens if not hundreds of times, published, and your first reviewer complains about the mistakes.

Tear hair out here!

Though I can’t find a scientific article to prove it, I did search “Why can’t we edit our own work” and most sites agree: it’s because we’re too invested in what we’ve written. Because we’ve read it over so many times, our brains know what we want to say, fill in the blanks, and we miss our errors. Microsoft Word does a good job of highlighting what it thinks are spelling, punctuation, and grammatical errors, but even that might not be good enough.

Enter Grammarly.

Grammarly might just be the best invention since sliced bread where publishing is concerned, but it does have its faults. Grammarly is only a computer program, it’s not an editing god, and every suggestion it makes must be taken with a grain of salt  (i.e., don’t go making haphazard changes just because Grammarly–or Word, for that matter–says so).

Having published five of my own books with the sixth on the way, and about seven or so more by other authors under my EMSA Publishing imprint,  I’ve adopted Grammarly as my last ditch edit before publishing. Here are a few things I’ve learned.

 1. Canadian spellings are marked as errors.

I’ve blogged about this before. Did you know that Canada (and the UK) are the rule and the US is the exception? What I mean is that what my American friends think are “cute”, Canadian foibles are actually the norm practically everywhere else in the world. And while you can change Grammarly’s dictionary for British English, there is no Canadian option. This might pose a problem because like the UK, we have the odd double consonant rule before adding a suffix, and then there’s the whole “our” ending thing, but unlike the UK, Canadians, for example, prefer “mom” to “mum”. It is for this reason I prefer to keep my dictionary set to American English.

The bottom line is that you have a choice if you’re Canadian: write in American English, or know your Canadian spelling rules and be sure to do a Google search to check all spellings Grammarly marks as incorrect.

2. Do a search and replace.

Grammarly marks words that should be hyphenated but aren’t, or words that are hyphenated but shouldn’t be. It also marks compound words that shouldn’t be or vice versa. The trouble is that it doesn’t do this consistently. I’ve found that, in many cases, it really doesn’t matter as long as you hyphenate or compound consistently.

For example, should it be “eco-terrorist” or “ecoterrorist”? I did a Google search and discovered that Wikipedia and The Toronto Star use the hyphenated version, while the FBI and The Washington Post don’t (and though the Star is Canadian, I don’t believe this is another US-Canada dichotomy). My conclusion is that both are correct, as long as I pick one and stick to it throughout. In some cases, Grammarly picked up on this, in others it didn’t, and I had to go through my manuscript with a search and replace to make sure I was consistent throughout.

3. Know your comma rules.

Oh, those dreaded commas!

I’ve learned quite a bit about them on my editing journey, most of which can be read here, but the bottom line is that while there are rules, there are some exceptions due to style. Grammarly often told me I was missing a comma where I believed there should be none, and told me I had an incorrect comma where I believed there should absolutely be one.  The bottom line is, you have to know your comma rules.

Perhaps the biggest issue I have when using Grammarly is with the Oxford comma, the one that says you must separate all items of a list with a comma. Here’s an article on the Grammarly blog explaining what the Oxford comma is and why people care so much about it. The Oxford comma conundrum is compounded with the rule about commas and conjunctions (that unless you have two independent clauses on either side of the conjunction, no comma is necessary). Grammarly often thought I was connecting two dependent clauses with a comma before my “and” when in fact, it was an item in a list with the Oxford comma.

For example:

He tried to patch things up, went into my room, discovered I was gone, and was waiting up for me.

In this case, Grammarly marks the comma in red as being incorrect, but in my mind, it denotes the fourth item in a list with an Oxford comma. This sentence has a parallel structure, detailing four things my main character’s father did:

  • he tried to patch things up
  • he went into her room
  • he discovered she was gone
  • and he was waiting up for her when she returned.

According to the way the Oxford comma works, to separate items in a list, this is absolutely the correct place for a comma to be, yet Grammarly marked it as an error.

Here’s another example:

Not to mention the fact that I’d just broken my dad’s heart.

So first: yes, this is a sentence fragment, but stylistically so. Secondly, Grammarly suggests a comma go after “dad’s” and before “heart”. The reason: “When speaking directly to people, their names must be set off by commas. Consider adding the comma(s).”

This sentence is a part of my main character’s internal conflict. She is in her bedroom, alone, thinking to herself and not speaking to anyone, least of all her father. Grammarly was way off the mark on this one.

The takeaway? Question every change Grammarly suggests before you make it.

4. Check, check, and double-check.

Grammarly occasionally marks incorrect word use when there is none. Case in point:

“Cain broke up with me,” I bawl, barely intelligible, to myself, anyway, between the sobs.

Grammarly wondered if I didn’t mean “bowl” instead of “bawl”, as if “I bowl, barely intelligible” makes any more sense.

“My sobs have long subsided into sniffles…”

Grammarly wants to change “sobs” to “sons”, because it makes more sense in the context.

Note that I’m not bashing Grammarly here. Rather, I use these examples to explain why it is important to check everything Grammarly suggests against alternate sources, particularly if the resulting change would make little sense.

5. Is your apostrophe used to indicate a possessive or a contraction?

Knowing how and when to use an apostrophe is paramount, especially when you’re relying on an app to find your errors.

For example,

 

They made it into the news because of their less than conventional behaviour during the protest and was forgotten a few days later.

Grammarly suggests that “their” is a “confused possessive and contraction”  and goes on to tell me that “It appears that the possessive pronoun their should be a contraction instead. Consider changing it.”

My option for change is therefore:

because of they are less than conventional

rather than “their” which Google defines as  “belonging to or associated with the people or things previously mentioned or easily identified,” which seems to be the obvious choice.

The moral of the story is: Grammarly is great, but only if you know what you’re doing when you’re using it. Technology should not be used as a replacement for our learning proper spelling, punctuation, and grammatical rules. Having said that, we must recognize that we live in a revolutionary age. We have millions (if not more) web pages to suggest spelling, and punctuation and grammatical usage at our fingertips, and authors must get into the habit of looking things up before they make changes, particularly when a collection of ones and zeros–which have the capacity for neither human speech nor human creativity–tells us our instincts are incorrect.

Share This:

Posted in Commentary, How to, Writing | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

15 Free Book Promo Sites

image made on placeit.net

I’m on the book promo path again. Newly edited, my last book, I Was, Am, Will Be Alice will be on sale for the month of January 2017 for only $0.99. I threw a lot of money behind it for advertising in the summer when it was released, so this time I’m reluctant to put any new money into the project. To that end, I went searching online and found 15 amazing and free book promo sites. I signed up at all of them, hoping it will help my prospects, and I want to share them all with you.

Without further ado, here are 15 free book promo sites (in no particular order) you can use to help promote your book. Note that I am writing this blog post in advance of seeing my book advertised and having any sales, so I cannot vouch for some of these sites except for the fact that they allow you to upload your book for free.

1. eBookSkill

Free promotions for eBook deals and giveaways.

2. eBookLister

Free promotions for eBooks that are free and/or under $2.99.

3. Armadillo eBooks

Free promotions for eBooks priced under $2.99. There is also a paid option to submit to 25 other sites for $25.00 (of which I did not take advantage).

4. Reading Deals

Free submissions for free and bargain books, though spots are limited and posts are not guaranteed. There is a $29.00 guaranteed post available. Reading Deals will send your post out to the 40,000 people they have on their mailing list.

5. Book Hippo

Book Hippo offers free book promos priced below 3.61 pounds. They will also post something called a “Drabble”, which is a flash fiction piece of 100 words or less. I have used Book Hippo before and they do not disappoint. Note that you will have to create a login for yourself before you will be allowed to post.

6. Discount Bookman

Free promotions for books with a $19.00 option for a featured post.

7. eBooksHabit

I applied to this site even though they require 5 reviews and I only have 3, so we’ll see what happens. They don’t accept erotica and they do check your price, so be sure to have the sale price in place before you apply.

8. This Is Writing

This is Writing offers guest posts, email blasts, interviews, and excerpt postings. Though they claim to get back to you asap, I have not heard back from them yet as of the posting of this blog (almost 1 week later), but they do say that it might take up to a month for them to respond to your request.

9. BookBongo

Free post on their site and Facebook page, though the post is not guaranteed. Guaranteed posts are available for between $9.99 and $29.99.

10. BookBrag

Free book promotion for books under $5.99. Other promotional packages are available for $10.00 and $20.00. I’ve used BookBrag for book promotion before and they always come through. They add your book to their site for free. Sometimes, if you’re lucky, you even make their newsletter. It’s nice to open up an email and see your own book being professionally promoted.

11. Book of the Day

Book of the Day will post your book in an “unfiltered” post for free on the day you choose. They also have paid options which allow you greater exposure and access to some of their advertising tools for $11.95. Once your book has been posted, you can pay $7.95 for a 21-day tour around their site for increased exposure.

12. Awesome Gang

Awesome Gang is truly awesome. In addition to offering advice and tools for authors, they allow you to post your books for free. There is a paid option that I’ve used in the past, $10.00 to feature your book, but I didn’t see a boost in sales (or any sales, for that matter), but that’s been the case for many paid features I’ve used at other sites, too.

13. Pretty-Hot

Like Awesome Gang, Pretty-Hot lets you post your books for free. Like BookBrag, you get a permanent listing for your book and sometimes wind up in their email blast. Also like the other sites, there is the option to feature your book for $25.00. I’ve used this site before and they’re pretty reliable as far as posting goes and I’ve made their newsletter more often than some of the other sites.

14. My Book Place

Affiliated with Pretty-Hot, My Book Place will post your books for free. There is also a $25.00 featured book post. Also like Pretty-Hot, My Book Place is reliable when it comes to posting on their site and I’ve seen my book a few times in their email blast, too.

15. Read Write Club

Similar set-up to the previous two sites, you can post your books for free and/or opt for the featured book post for $25.00.

My Marketing Plan

Also in my marketing plan for this sale is a BKKnights post (on Fivver) and boosting a Facebook post for $7. I also plan to do some posting myself in my own newsletter, on my sites, and to Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

The proceeds from any book sales will go into keeping the momentum going by upping the ante and paying for a few ads to see how many copies in total I can sell.

Do you know of any other sites on which you can post discount books for free? If so, please feel free to share them in the comments of this post.

Bonus sites

I’m still searching for more promotional sites for free. Here is another that I found after I published the above article:

1. Free 99 Books

Though there is no guarantee they will add your book to their newsletter, they do create a page for your book on their site.

 

Share This:

Posted in Alice, How to, Writing | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments