15 Free Book Promo Sites

image made on placeit.net

I’m on the book promo path again. Newly edited, my last book, I Was, Am, Will Be Alice will be on sale for the month of January 2017 for only $0.99. I threw a lot of money behind it for advertising in the summer when it was released, so this time I’m reluctant to put any new money into the project. To that end, I went searching online and found 15 amazing and free book promo sites. I signed up at all of them, hoping it will help my prospects, and I want to share them all with you.

Without further ado, here are 15 free book promo sites (in no particular order) you can use to help promote your book. Note that I am writing this blog post in advance of seeing my book advertised and having any sales, so I cannot vouch for some of these sites except for the fact that they allow you to upload your book for free.

1. eBookSkill

Free promotions for eBook deals and giveaways.

2. eBookLister

Free promotions for eBooks that are free and/or under $2.99.

3. Armadillo eBooks

Free promotions for eBooks priced under $2.99. There is also a paid option to submit to 25 other sites for $25.00 (of which I did not take advantage).

4. Reading Deals

Free submissions for free and bargain books, though spots are limited and posts are not guaranteed. There is a $29.00 guaranteed post available. Reading Deals will send your post out to the 40,000 people they have on their mailing list.

5. Book Hippo

Book Hippo offers free book promos priced below 3.61 pounds. They will also post something called a “Drabble”, which is a flash fiction piece of 100 words or less. I have used Book Hippo before and they do not disappoint. Note that you will have to create a login for yourself before you will be allowed to post.

6. Discount Bookman

Free promotions for books with a $19.00 option for a featured post.

7. eBooksHabit

I applied to this site even though they require 5 reviews and I only have 3, so we’ll see what happens. They don’t accept erotica and they do check your price, so be sure to have the sale price in place before you apply.

8. This Is Writing

This is Writing offers guest posts, email blasts, interviews, and excerpt postings. Though they claim to get back to you asap, I have not heard back from them yet as of the posting of this blog (almost 1 week later), but they do say that it might take up to a month for them to respond to your request.

9. BookBongo

Free post on their site and Facebook page, though the post is not guaranteed. Guaranteed posts are available for between $9.99 and $29.99.

10. BookBrag

Free book promotion for books under $5.99. Other promotional packages are available for $10.00 and $20.00. I’ve used BookBrag for book promotion before and they always come through. They add your book to their site for free. Sometimes, if you’re lucky, you even make their newsletter. It’s nice to open up an email and see your own book being professionally promoted.

11. Book of the Day

Book of the Day will post your book in an “unfiltered” post for free on the day you choose. They also have paid options which allow you greater exposure and access to some of their advertising tools for $11.95. Once your book has been posted, you can pay $7.95 for a 21-day tour around their site for increased exposure.

12. Awesome Gang

Awesome Gang is truly awesome. In addition to offering advice and tools for authors, they allow you to post your books for free. There is a paid option that I’ve used in the past, $10.00 to feature your book, but I didn’t see a boost in sales (or any sales, for that matter), but that’s been the case for many paid features I’ve used at other sites, too.

13. Pretty-Hot

Like Awesome Gang, Pretty-Hot lets you post your books for free. Like BookBrag, you get a permanent listing for your book and sometimes wind up in their email blast. Also like the other sites, there is the option to feature your book for $25.00. I’ve used this site before and they’re pretty reliable as far as posting goes and I’ve made their newsletter more often than some of the other sites.

14. My Book Place

Affiliated with Pretty-Hot, My Book Place will post your books for free. There is also a $25.00 featured book post. Also like Pretty-Hot, My Book Place is reliable when it comes to posting on their site and I’ve seen my book a few times in their email blast, too.

15. Read Write Club

Similar set-up to the previous two sites, you can post your books for free and/or opt for the featured book post for $25.00.

My Marketing Plan

Also in my marketing plan for this sale is a BKKnights post (on Fivver) and boosting a Facebook post for $7. I also plan to do some posting myself in my own newsletter, on my sites, and to Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

The proceeds from any book sales will go into keeping the momentum going by upping the ante and paying for a few ads to see how many copies in total I can sell.

Do you know of any other sites on which you can post discount books for free? If so, please feel free to share them in the comments of this post.

Bonus sites

I’m still searching for more promotional sites for free. Here is another that I found after I published the above article:

1. Free 99 Books

Though there is no guarantee they will add your book to their newsletter, they do create a page for your book on their site.

 

Paleo Mug Muffins – Bonus Recipe #2!

Introducing Paleo, Gluten Free, and Low Carb Mug Muffins: A Baker’s Dozen of One Minute Muffins

Sweet tooth got your tongue?

It’s happened to all of us–we want to eat healthier, but then we’re sabotaged by cravings for sugar, salty, carb-laden snacks. Rather than reach for a chocolate bar or bag of chips the next time the carb craving hits, reach for a mug muffin instead. Paleo, Gluten Free, and Low Carb Mug Muffins are a healthy-ish alternative, great for breakfast, dessert, or just because.

Paleo, Gluten Free, and Low Carb Mug Muffins will show you how to make a baker’s dozen of different mug muffins from a single base recipe. Choose from Black Forest Cherry, Blueberry Crumble, Carrot Cake, Red Velvet, and Apple Fritter…and we’re just getting started! In addition to recipes, you will learn about the health benefits of the basic building block ingredients, such as the flours, sweeteners, and fiber options used to make the best mug muffins you’ve ever tasted!

Introducing: Pumpkin Pie!

I have this amazing pumpkin pie recipe that I make year round. It has walnuts and almonds for the crust and cashews and more walnuts in the custard. I don’t care much for walnuts, so I substitute pecans. When the pie’s cooled, I cut it into slices and freeze each slice separately. If I transfer it to the fridge the night before, I have a delicious, filling breakfast, lunch, or evening snack.

Pureed pumpkin comes in a huge can, and my recipe only uses about half, so I’m usually in a mad rush on Pinterest to find pumpkin recipes to use up the leftovers before they spoil. That’s when the idea came to me: try to make a Paleo mug muffin with all of the flavours of pumpkin pie!

Here’s the recipe I came up with. Feel free to fine-tune the sweetener and/or spices as you see fit.

To find out the basic recipe, buy Paleo, Gluten Free, and Low Carb Mug Muffins: A Baker’s Dozen of One Minute Muffins.

Other bonus recipes: Snickerdoodle.

Here’s how:

From the basic recipe, omit:

  • maple syrup – substitute 1 tsp molasses (optional – it works well either way, but it tastes more pumpkin pie-ey with the molasses, I think)

Add:

  • 1 Tbsp almond flour
  • 1 heaping Tbsp pumpkin puree (not pie filling)
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • pinch (or two) of nutmeg (depending on how fond you are of it)
  • 4 or 5 chopped pecans
  • handful of chocolate chips

Mix and bake recipe according to instructions in the book.

Note: Pumpkin tends to be on the sweet side, but the extra sweetness of the molasses adds a unique flavour profile that I can only describe as unctuous and nothing short of delicious.

The measurements in this recipe made the muffin slightly spicy, probably as a result of upping the ginger. And while I’m not a nutmeg fan, I realize that recipes like this need a little nutmeg. I started with 1 shake from my bottle and settled on 3 shakes, which is a little more than 2 pinches. The nutmeg is still subtle, and helps to draw the connection to the pumpkin pie that inspired it.

For the basic paleo, gluten free, and low carb mug muffin recipe along with more than 13 variations on the recipe, buy Paleo, Gluten Free, and Low Carb Mug Muffins: A Baker’s Dozen of One Minute Muffins.

Comma Gain?

Punctuation rules are confusing, particularly those surrounding commas, semi-colons, and dashes. In this post, I tackle the comma: when to use it, and how much is too much.

The Oxford Comma

The Oxford Comma refers to the comma used to separate items in a list, particularly before the “and”. The perfect example of this is

While common sense can help to sort out problems such as this one, when the reader must pause to engage critical thinking skills to sort this out, it pulls them from the narrative and spoils the experience.

Commas and Conjunctions

Use a comma before a conjunction with two independent clauses, but not when there is only one independent clause. For example:

Two independent clauses: I want to eat, and I want to sleep. [Both clauses on either side of the conjunction can stand alone as their own sentences.]

One independent clause: I want to eat and sleep. [Only “I want to eat” can stand on its own as an independent clause.]

Semicolons vs. Commas

In a long list, where there are already commas, use semicolons to separate items in a list:

Once Upon A Time has several subplots going: Rumplestiltskin and Belle, who also double as Beauty and the Beast; Dr. Jeckyll and Mr. Hyde, which serves as the segue into the Land of Untold Stories arc; and The Dr. Whale/Dr. Frankenstein connection, which may wind up saving Storybrook from evil, once again.

Semicolons are also used to separate two independent, yet related clauses (without a conjunction):

Some fans might say that Rumplestiltskin is the quintessential villain; the Evil Queen comes in a close second.

With the exception of the list rule, a semicolon should never be used in place of a comma, or a colon, for that matter. Note: see example above for proper colon use (or the start of this sentence). In general, a colon denotes a list to follow.

Commas After Conjunctions

Commas should NEVER be used after conjunctions (this is one of my pet peeves). Though we often pause after conjunctions like “and”, it is not correct to put a comma there. Consider my horrible example from above:

I want to eat and, if I can ever find the time, I want to sleep.

If you were to read this aloud, it might sound right, but it’s grammatically incorrect. Per the rule above, the comma should come before the “and”.

I want to eat, and if I can ever find the time, I want to sleep.

This is correct as the phrase “and if I can ever find the time” is an aside. See note below regarding the use of commas and asides.

Is it ever okay to break the rules?

Sometimes, in dialogue, it is okay to break the rules. For example, in I Was, Am, Will Be Alice, Pete, Alice’s boyfriend, asks:

Could I see, like, dinosaurs, or travel to see how mankind evolves a couple a thousand years from now?

Though technically, this isn’t exactly rule breaking, as it is correct to put commas around an aside in a sentence (giving additional information without which the sentence is still an independent clause), “like” is more of a speech habit than an aside, but the commas work in this context.

English is a Funny Language

As I write this post, I am going back and editing my recently published novel, I Was, Am, Will Be Alice, via Grammarly. I do this as a result of a review that claimed I had quite a few errors in my book, which I took as a personal affront, as I freelance as an editor. Grammarly tagged quite a few “errors” that really aren’t errors in the true sense of poor grammar and/or typographical errors (although, admittedly, there were a few, but I could count these on my fingers and still have a few left over). I’ve decided to write this and other posts to set the record straight with respect to grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

Here’s some of what I’ve learned:

OR vs. OUR

Both Canadians and Brits spell words like colour, neighbour, and favour (and a whole host of other words with similar endings) with an extra “u”, probably as a result of our French roots.

L vs. LL

Many words ending in “l” double the letter before adding the ending. Travelling is one of these words (as opposed to “traveling” in American English). There are exceptions to this rule, and “instalment” is one of them, spelled with a single “l” in Canadian but a double “l” (installment) in American. Weird.

The elusive E

It is perfectly acceptable to add an extra “E” in words such as “acknowledgement” and “judgement” in Canadian English (“acknowledgment” and “judgment” in American English respectively). Interestingly enough, the word “jewellery” is the proper, Canadian/British spelling of the American “jewelry”, contrary to what one of my reviewers criticized.

In Canadian English, “insure” tends to refer to issuing and insurance policy, whereas “ensure” means to make sure. Though some sites, like Writer’s Digest,  insist there is a difference, other sites, like The Oxford English Dictionary, say that while the primary meaning for “insure” is the insurance connection, it is sometimes used in American English to mean “to make sure”. It is for this reason that my American clients insist using “insure” throughout.

C vs. S

Many American spellings favour “se” rather than “ce”. Examples of this include “licence” (Canadian) vs. “license” (American); “offence” (Canadian) vs. “offense” (American) ; and “defence” (Candian) vs. “defense” (American).

Commas Inside or Outside of Quotation Marks?

While we’re on the subject of Canadian vs. American, it’s important to note that in American English, the commas and periods go on the inside of quotation marks, while in Canadian and British English, they go on the outside. Note that this does not apply to dialogue. For example,

American: Canadian spellings are frequently tagged by American reviewers as “errors.”

Canadian: Canadian spellings are frequently tagged by American reviewers as “errors”.

Which Came First: The Chicken or the Egg?

“Dialogue”, as it is spelled above, is correct in Canada, with Americans preferring “dialog”. Some websites say that “dialogue” is to be used for conversation and “dialog” for a pop-up box to communicate with a computer. I also read that “dialogue” is gradually being replaced, primarily in America, for the shorter, “dialog”. I have to wonder if the reason the shorter spelling is used for the computer is because dialog boxes originate in the States, and therefore, the American spelling is used. Definitely a chicken or egg scenario.

Interestingly enough, Canadian English distinguishes between “blonde” for a woman with blonde hair, and “blond” for a man. This is largely due to ties with the French, as this is the rule in French grammar. While some sites say that “blond” is common for both men and women, others say “blond” is always used though it is still acceptable to use “blonde” for a woman in Canadian English. I would argue that this is not the case in Canada and that one should always use “blonde” for women, but with such a loosey-gooesy rule, one can hardly call this an error, unless you use “blonde” to refer to a male.

In Conclusion…

Keep in mind that I come at this from a uniquely Canadian perspective. Many of the “errors” Grammarly marked in my manuscript were simply the difference between American and Canadian spellings, and these should not be considered errors. As most of my clients are American, I’ve learned a few things regarding the differences between Canadian, British, and American English, and I’ve learned that one rule does not fit all, and just when you think you have it, there’s an exception to the rule, and you’ve broken it! Much of what I know about spelling American, is recently learned, as to me, spelling Canadian is the norm (and I’d like to think I’m quite good at it, having won more than a few spelling bees in my youth). An American can no more call the Candian and/or British spelling of a word an error, any more than a Canadian or a Brit can call the American spelling an error.–if you’re going to read, and/or review indie books, you simply

The bottom line is, if you’re going to read, and/or review indie books, you simply must be aware of the differences. Hopefully, my posts will help.

Paleo Mug Muffins – Bonus Recipe!

paleo-mug-muffins-coverIntroducing Paleo, Gluten Free, and Low Carb Mug Muffins: A Baker’s Dozen of One Minute Muffins

Sweet tooth got your tongue?

It’s happened to all of us–we want to eat healthier, but then we’re sabotaged by cravings for sugar, salty, carb-laden snacks. Rather than reach for a chocolate bar or bag of chips the next time the carb craving hits, reach for a mug muffin instead. Paleo, Gluten Free, and Low Carb Mug Muffins are a healthy-ish alternative, great for breakfast, dessert, or just because.

Paleo, Gluten Free, and Low Carb Mug Muffins will show you how to make a baker’s dozen of different mug muffins from a single base recipe. Choose from Black Forest Cherry, Blueberry Crumble, Carrot Cake, Red Velvet, and Apple Fritter…and we’re just getting started! In addition to recipes, you will learn about the health benefits of the basic building block ingredients, such as the flours, sweeteners, and fiber options used to make the best mug muffins you’ve ever tasted!

Introducing: Snickerdoodle!

This summer, I vowed to get back on track with my diet by KOing popcorn and chocolate. The only thing that kept me going were my mug muffins. Turns out, a little bit of sweetness in the morning was enough to curb my sweet tooth and/or chocolate craving. Before I knew it, the cravings were gone!

Paleo, Gluten Free, and Low Carb Mug Muffins: A Baker’s Dozen of One Minute Muffins was the result of my summer experimentation–a girl can only eat so many double-chocolate and chocolate chip muffins before she gets bored. I decided to document it as I experimented with flavours and the result is my recipe book.

Publishing the book isn’t the end of it, though. I’m still experimenting. One hot flavour nowadays is snickerdoodle. The more recipes I saw for snickerdoodle-flavoured things, the more curious I was to see what the hype was all about, and so I created a Snickerdoodle One Minute Muffin variation for my basic recipe. To find out the basic recipe, you’ll have to buy the book, which is available here, from my book page.

alien-1295486For the uninitiated who might be asking exactly what a snickerdoodle is, it’s not the name you might give to the drawing of a Snickers bar, nor is it some kind of crazy alien like the guy on the right. It’s a caramel-flavoured, nuttiness that can be infused into any cake, cookie, candy, or in this case, a paleo, gluten free, and low carb mug muffin.

Here’s how:

To the basic recipe, omit:

  • maple syrup

Add:

  • 1 tsp of your favourite nut butter
  • 1 tsp coconut sugar
  • pinch of cinnamon
  • handful of butterscotch or peanut butter chips

Now, I know that butterscotch and/or peanut butter chips are neither healthy, nor are they paleo. I am also aware that peanuts, aka legumes, are not paleo, and purists can omit this ingredient if they choose. However, if you don’t mind the odd “cheat” they make the caramel flavour really pop.

Mix and bake recipe according to instructions in the book.

For the basic paleo, gluten free, and low carb mug muffin recipe along with more than 13 variations on the recipe, buy Paleo, Gluten Free, and Low Carb Mug Muffins: A Baker’s Dozen of One Minute Muffins.

The Power of Paying It Forward

network

Never underestimate the power of paying it forward.

When I launched my book two years ago, I had a small network of authors. I could count on a single hand how many connections I had with fingers still left over. When I planned my first blog tour, I was touched by the number of people who agreed to post materials for me, totally free of charge, and I was inspired to do the same.

Most authors already have their own blogs. If you don’t have one, I urge you to go out and get one (I have three–they’re great!). I purchased my own domain name, and pay a web server provider yearly to house my email and WordPress account. If you can’t afford to do that, you can still begin a blog, totally for free.

Creating  a secondary blog

If you already have a blog, contact your web server provider and ask how you can set up another. My site uses WordPress, and it was really easy to set up another web site, totally free of charge. Keep the site under your author’s domain name strictly for your self-promotion. Keep the second site strictly for promoting other authors.

If you have a blog with a free service, like WordPress.com  or Wix.com, then you can create a second blog at no extra charge.

When someone offers to host your blog tour, offer to do the same for them when the time comes.

How to find stuff to blog about

If you’re worried about how you will ever find enough time to create posts for your promotional blog, simply sign on as hosts for services who promote blog tours. These sites are always looking for blogs to help them out. They often send emails directly to your inbox and you can pick and choose which ones you would like to post. You might even get a free book or two out of it if you sign up to write a review.

Here are a few that I’ve discovered over the years:

Call in a favour

The first thing I did when planning my blog tour was to contact everyone I had hosted on my promotional site a month in advance of the book’s release date, and ask if they’d be willing to host for my new blog tour.

I live in Canada, and there are strict rules for advertising via unsolicited email, and the last thing I wanted to do was to have the CRTC at my back, so I began with the following disclaimer (slightly edited):

Hello.

Firstly, I want to thank each and every one of you for helping me to build Britbear’s Book Reviews into a success. Whether you have contributed by allowing me the opportunity to review your book, or by posting publicity materials, you have helped me to build my network and provide a platform for authors to help sell their books.

Now, I have a favour to ask.

I have my latest release scheduled for this July 12th, and I’d love it if you would be able to help me publicize my books, either by posting a review, or by posting publicity materials for me during the week of its release.

If you are unable to help, no worries. Britbear’s Book  Reviews remains open to each and every one of you as a venue to  help you publicize your future releases. If, however, you are able to help, it would be greatly appreciated.

Once more, a HUGE thank you to each and every one of you!

Elise Abram

This was followed by

alice email

  • a cover image
    • the title of the
      book
  • the logline (one sentence summary)
  • genre list
  • number of pages
  • release date
  • blog tour dates
  • back cover blurb

The email went out to 46 people. Three people volunteered to post materials. Three others volunteered to post reviews (that I know of).

I know some of you will be doing a bit of math now–roughly 13%.

But remember that a week is only 7 days long. One email and 6/7 days are already taken care of.

Now do the math: one email and roughly 86% of my blog tour booked–those are numbers I can get behind!

Best Practice Blog Tour

suitcase_edited-4

I took a course a few years ago at a local university on book promotions, and the instructor swore that the blog tour was the most important publicity tool you will have. When I signed with a publisher for the last book, he was less than convinced about the correlation between running blog tours and successful book launches. Undaunted, I planned and ran my own month long blog tour for the release of my last novel, The Revenant: A YA Paranormal Thriller with Zombies with limited results. As a baseline comparison, I also hired a company to run a week long blog tour the following month, also with limited results.

In this series of posts, I plan to blog about the days leading up to the release and blog tour to help publicize  my new novel, I Was, Am, Will Be Alice. This time through I’ve scheduled my own again, trying to post as much material as I can to as many websites as I can over the course of a week, and compare that to my sales (something I couldn’t do last time as my publisher had control to all of the data).

I plan to be transparent in my posts, sharing with you how I went about the planning and execution of my tour as well as how it effects book sales, with the hope that I can help other authors to do the same.

I would be remiss if I did not share the document that gave me the idea to plan my own blog tour rather than pay someone to do it for me. Before I set out to go it on my own, I read A. Terry’s How to Promote Your Book with a Blog Tour, Volume 2 in Terry’s Book Marketing Survival Guide Series.

I won’t lie–planning a blog tour on your own takes a lot of work. You have to have good organizational and writing skills to do it. In addition, you must be willing to invest your time during the tour, sharing on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Pinterest, Storify, etc. But in the end, it will all be worth it as it (should) help sell books, but it will also help you to network and make a whole bunch of new contacts to help build your writing community for the next time around.

Kudos for “I Was, Am, Will Be Alice”

alice blue cover

I Was, Am, Will Be Alice is the winner of the A Woman’s Write competition for 2015!

Here’s what Barbara Bamberger Scott of A Woman’s Write had to say about Alice:

Elise, who hails from Canada, has composed an elaborate time-travel fantasy based on Lewis Carroll’s world-famous classic “Alice” books. Her book is entitled I Was, Am, Will Be Alice. Starting with her mysterious role in a school shooting, we follow the heroine as she grows up, seeking the identity of the shooter, traveling back and forth in time to encounter characters reminding us of a modernized conception of Wonderland. Well conceived and cleverly carried through. Congratulations, Elise Abram!

In I Was, Am, Will Be Alice

When Alice Carroll is in grade three she narrowly escapes losing her life in a school shooting. All she remembers is the woman comforting her in the moments before the gunshot, and that one second she was there, the next she wasn’t.

It’s bad enough coming to terms with surviving while others, including her favourite teacher, didn’t, let alone dealing with the fact that she might wink out of existence at any time.

Alice spends the next few years seeing specialists about her Post Traumatic Stress as a result of VD–Voldemort Day–but it’s not until she has a nightmare about The Day That Shall Not Be Mentioned, disappears from her bed, is found by police, and taken home to meet her four-year-old self that she realizes she’s been time travelling.

Alice is unsure if her getting unstuck in time should be considered an ability or a liability, until she disappears right in front of her high school at dismissal time, the busiest time of day. Worried that someone may find out about her problem before long, Alice enlists her best friend (and maybe boyfriend), Pete, to help her try to control her shifting through time with limited success. She’s just about ready to give up when the shooter is caught. Now more than ever, Alice is determined to take control of her time travelling in order to go back to That Day, stop the shooting, and figure out the identity of the stranger who’d shielded Alice’s body with her own.

I Was, Am, Will Be Alice is scheduled for a summer 2016 release.

Complications: Mild-mannered Doctor goes Commando

Complications-1050x592

Jason O’Mara stars in “Complications”.

Thank you so much to Callum at Cultured Vultures for posting!

Complications, Jason O’Mara plays Dr. John Ellison, a mild-mannered ER doctor who goes commando when he witnesses a drive-by shooting in a park. Grieving the loss of his daughter to cancer the year before, he’s on his way to the vet to save a mauled squirrel when he realizes the animal has died. This most recent death brings back the emotions experienced during his daughter’s illness and death. Overwhelmed, Ellison stops the car in front of a park only to witnesses the boy being shot…

To read more, check out my review at the Cultured Vultures site!

I’m a Cultured Vulture!

cvlogo

 

Revenants are Real!

On 19 June 15, the Ancient Origins website published an article by Mark Miller entitled “Ancient Greeks apparently feared zombies so much they weighed down the dead“.  In his article, Miller says ancient inhabitants of the island of Sicily feared zombies so much they used large boulders to weigh down the bodies of the newly buried dead. This, apparently, was the result of the fear of revenants held by the Ancient Greeks. Miller defines revenants as existing in a state between life and death, in which the undead would be able to “ris[e] from their graves to haunt the living.”

Both Miller and an article published by Richard Gray on Mail Online quote heavily from a Popular Archaeology article which confirms that “necrophobia, or fear of the dead…has been present in Greek culture from the Neolithic period to the present.”   These articles are the result of the excavation of a site in Sicily yielding close to 3,000 bodies. Two of the burials found were covered with heavy amphora fragments and rocks, presumably “to trap [the bodies] in the grave.”

In her article, Carrie L. Sulosky Weaver defines revenants as “reanimated corpses [who] rose from their graves, prowled the streets, and stalked unsuspecting victims, often to exact retribution denied to them in life.” She goes on to explain that  the Ancient Greeks believed that “even those who could not physically leave their tombs posed a threat, because mediums could easily invoke restless spirits and cajole them into committing heinous acts…[N]ecromancy, the purposeful invocation of the dead,” was another of their practices for which there is evidence in the archaeological record.

There are two revenants in The Revenant. Zulu is thrown from his horse on his way to elope with his sweetheart in nineteenth century Toronto. Raised from the dead by a necromancer, he has walked the earth for more than two centuries, searching for his beloved Alma. His lifelong companion has been Morgan, a seer with the gift of longevity. Together, they save the people Morgan sees in his dreams from certain death. Malchus, the other revenant in the story, also seeks closure, but in his relationship with his brother. Raised in spirit form and inhabiting the body of a local teen, Malchus believes his brother, Morgan, is responsible for his death, and he intends to exact retribution. The Revenant is a young adult paranormal thriller with zombies that pits brother against brother in the archetypal battle between good and evil. Will Zulu and Morgan survive, or will Malchus emerge victorious?

Buy The Revenant wherever eBooks are sold.